Informal step in English proceedings allowed a European Enforcement Order to be made

Chachani Misti v (1) Hostplanet Ltd & (2) Finn Grimpe [2016] EWHC 983 (Ch), decided on 29 April 2016, should be carefully noted by defendants seeking to avoid enforcement of a judgment.  It also demonstrates the potential difficulties in obtaining a European Enforcement Order (“EEO”) if service has been by email. Continue reading

Israeli will dispute not to be heard in England: Winkler v Shamoon [2016] EWHC 217 (Ch)

The Chancery Division’s lengthy judgment earlier this week in a dispute between the legatees of a billionaire Israeli businessman (Mr Shamoon) makes interesting reading.  The result is that the English court would not take jurisdiction over a dispute about whether certain shares were to be treated as part of Mr Shamoon’s estate.

As well as covering specific points on the scope of the succession exception in Regulation 44/2001 (Brussels I), the judgment contains useful guidance on general points notably, what constitutes submission to the jurisdiction (at common law and under the Regulation). Continue reading

Avoiding enforcement of default judgment: Vizcaya Partners Ltd v Picard [2016] UKPC 5

In its advice delivered today on appeal from the Gibraltar Court of Appeal, the Privy Council examines when a judgment debtor will be regarded as having agreed to the jurisdiction of a foreign court (in advance rather than by appearance) so that a foreign default judgment may be enforced against him in another jurisdiction (in this case Gibraltar).  The Board’s advice also provides a convenient summary of the role of experts on foreign law.

The Board’s advice is given by Lord Collins (editor of the leading text Dicey, Morris and Collins on the Conflict of Laws).  It examines a great deal of apparently conflicting previous authority. It is therefore not surprising that the Board considered the case so important that it has delivered its advice notwithstanding the settlement, post hearing, of the underlying dispute.

The conclusion reached is that an agreement to submit to the foreign court’s jurisdiction may be implied. Continue reading