Court agrees with Deutsche Bank – Singapore is not more convenient

An alleged fraud (relating to a sale of Indian cotton) between an Indian, a Malaysian and a Hong Kong company has generated multiple claims in Singapore and one in London, Detusche Bank AG v CIMB Bank Berhad.  These arise from the typical web of letters of credit, finance facilities and guarantees found in international commodities finance.   In London, Deutsche Bank (DB) claim reimbursement from CIMB (a Malaysian bank) of sums paid out under letters of credit issued by CIMB.

Of interest for this blog is the Commercial Court’s decision last week ([2017] EWHC 81 (Comm)) refusing to grant CIMB a stay of the London proceedings on the basis of forum non conveniens.  Teare J’s judgment is a pithy demonstration of the English court’s approach to such arguments applying the Spiliada[1] principles (discussed below).

A key point to note is that the mere risk of inconsistent decisions on a factual point and the duplication of costs was not enough to justify a stay of English proceedings.  The case also should give parties pause to consider before beginning parallel proceedings in another jurisdiction (see my final thoughts on tactics)

20 Essex Street’s Andrew Fulton appeared for Deutsche Bank. Continue reading